Special Interest Days Wednesday, 2nd October, 2019 Art and Revolution:  Romanovs to Stalin Rosamund Bartlett Before the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace in 1917, Russian artists  staged a daring revolution of their own by changing the language of art. Suddenly they became the leaders of the European avant-garde. At the time of the Revolution, some, like Stravinsky, Goncharova and Roerich, chose to remain in emigration, in the hope of one day returning to Russia, while others, like Kandinsky, Chagall and Malevich, went on to play a leading role in early Soviet culture, amidst utopian hopes for a bright future. This lecture will explore the major developments in Russian art in the early revolutionary years. A section of Suprematist works by Kazimir Malevich exhibited at the 0.10 Exhibition, Petrograd, 1915
 The Arts Society Rutland
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Special Interest Days Wednesday, 2nd October, 2019 Art and Revolution:  Romanovs to Stalin Rosamund Bartlett Before the Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace in 1917, Russian artists staged a daring revolution of their own by changing the language of art. Suddenly they became the leaders of the European avant-garde. At the time of the Revolution, some, like Stravinsky, Goncharova and Roerich, chose to remain in emigration, in the hope of one day returning to Russia, while others, like Kandinsky, Chagall and Malevich, went on to play a leading role in early Soviet culture, amidst utopian hopes for a bright future. This lecture will explore the major developments in Russian art in the early revolutionary years. A section of Suprematist works by Kazimir Malevich exhibited at the 0.10 Exhibition, Petrograd, 1915
The Arts Society Rutland