The Arts Society Rutland
Programme for 2019 March 21, 2019 Barbara Askew Victoria and Albert: Art and Love This lecture celebrates the 200th Anniversary of the births of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert who were first cousins and born just three months apart in 1819.  Their shared enthusiasm for art and music endured throughout the twenty-two years of their marriage and they demonstrated their love through the works of art and jewellery they gave each other for birthdays, Christmases and anniversaries. Victoria and Albert understood and appreciated sculpture more than any of their predecessors since Charles I. They furnished and extended Buckingham Palace, made significant changes to Windsor Castle and commissioned three other royal residences, Balmoral, Sandringham and Osborne – the single most important example of their shared taste. Theirs was a partnership of patronage by a monarch and her consort which is unique in the history of the British monarchy. The wedding of Albert & Victoria The portrait, known as ‘the secret picture’, was commissioned by the young Queen in 1843 as a 24th birthday present for her beloved husband Albert. It was painted by the respected artist Franz Xaver Winterhalter. April 18, 2019 Andrew Prince Jewelled Journeys:  The Art of Opulent Travel Details Throughout history, travelling has been used as a way to display wealth, power, status, as well as a useful tool to control over mighty subjects. Today, we take a journey as a matter of course, not thinking much of a distance of a hundred miles or more. In the past it was very different as an Aristocrat had to take not only clothes, but food, furniture, cooking facilities, tents, and the like, not just for himself and family but his household as well. In this talk, Andrew shows the many lavish and opulent accessories and modes of transport that were used by Monarchs and Aristocracy alike, to ease travel while on their seasonal “progress” to and from each others estates, and where diplomatic meetings between Kings turned into a contest of rivals to see who could out do each other in the finest accommodation, jewels, silks, retinue and luggage train. Entrance of the Emperor Franz I. Stephan and his son Joseph (II.) into Frankfurt on March 29, 1764 by Johann Dallinger von Dalling, 1767 May 16, 2019 Jonathan Foyle Cathedrals with Particular Mention of Peterborough and Lincoln No synopsis yet, details later. Peterborough Cathedral web site Lincoln Cathedral web site There are no meetings in June, July or August September 19, 2019 Catherine Wallace: Under the Open Sky: Newlyn, Falmouth and Lamorna Artists 1880 - 1940 This lecture gives an overview of art in Cornwall from the late19th century to the start of the Second World War that was created in and around the remote villages of Newlyn and Lamorna in West Cornwall and the port of Falmouth. It begins with the Social Realism of artists such as Walter Langley and Frank Bramley who captured the harshness of life for families in the fishing community of Newlyn. This lecture then looks at the fame that artists such as Stanhope Forbes achieved both at home and abroad in the 1880s and 90s with his depictions of village life and his fascination with capturing low light levels. It also surveys the maritime art of Henry Scott Tuke and Charles Napier Hemy who were based in Falmouth, 28 miles east of Newlyn. Some of the artists created magical fantasies rather than images of stark realism and the colourful Pre-Raphaelite inspired creations of Elizabeth Adela Forbes, Henry Meynell Rheam and Thomas Cooper Gotch are included here. Elizabeth Forbes The influence of the Forbes School of painting, which was established in 1899 at Newlyn by Stanhope and his wife Elizabeth, is shown in the work of some of their students such as Dod and Ernest Procter. More information on the Lamorna Artists October 17, 2019 Dr. Graham Griffiths Musical Adventures in Russia:   In Search of The Snow-Maiden Leokadiya Kashperova For a historian, there can be little to match the excitement of discovering a forgotten treasure. Dr Griffiths’s eventful research across Russia to unveil the Romantic figure of Leokadiya Kashperova (1872-1940), composer and concert pianist (previously known only as ‘Stravinsky’s piano teacher’), offers the perfect example. Kashperova’s re-discovered music establishes her as the earliest-known female Russian composer of international stature. (Rimsky-Korsakov’s affectionate nickname for her was ‘Snow-maiden’.) Kashperova’s lyrical music and Griffiths’s research were selected by BBC Radio 3 and the AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council) for inclusion in their 2018 celebration of ‘Five Forgotten Female Composers’. This presentation offers narrative, images and musical performance at the piano illustrating ‘what it takes’ to recover the life and works of a composer whom History has completely forgotten. Until now. Performance of Leokadiya Kashperova music  November 21, 2019 Charles Hajdamach Flowers of The Fields:  The World of Paperweights Glass paperweights, with their trapped secret interiors, hold a special fascination for everyone whether they are glass enthusiasts or not. This talk outlines their history from their introduction in Venice, to the classical period of French weights from Baccarat, Saint Louis and Clichy in the middle of the 19th century and ending with some of the modern weights from the famous Scottish factory of Caithness. An explanation of how weights are made will reveal the huge technical skills involved in their production. Click here for the Caithness Glass web site December 19, 2019 Claire Walsh The Christmas Tree:  From Forest Fir to Festive Feature The Christmas Tree presents us with over five centuries of art and meaning. Vital to the imagery of both the pagan world and Christianity, its significance emerges in Norse yuletide, ancient Rome and with the early-medieval saints, before its diverse strands were drawn together to symbolize the modern Christmas. It is wrapped in legend, from the Icelandic sagas to St Boniface, from the Mystery Plays to Martin Luther. In art, the forest fir has made the transition from Viking rock carvings to German Romanticism and Scandinavian naturalism, on its way to finding its place as an icon of our modern festival. Decorated and shimmering with light, it has brought Christmas from outside the home into the heart of the family, it has drawn soldiers together across No- Man’s Land, and it continues to symbolize its essential, timeless message of Peace on Earth. The History of Christmas Trees Christmas tree at Windsor Castle from The Illustrated London News Christmas supplement 1848
Web site and mobile phone pages created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
Programme for 2019 March 21, 2019 Barbara Askew Victoria and Albert: Art and Love This lecture celebrates the 200th Anniversary of the births of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert who were first cousins and born just three months apart in 1819.  Their shared enthusiasm for art and music endured throughout the twenty- two years of their marriage and they demonstrated their love through the works of art and jewellery they gave each other for birthdays, Christmases and anniversaries. Victoria and Albert understood and appreciated sculpture more than any of their predecessors since Charles I. They furnished and extended Buckingham Palace, made significant changes to Windsor Castle and commissioned three other royal residences, Balmoral, Sandringham and Osborne – the single most important example of their shared taste. Theirs was a partnership of patronage by a monarch and her consort which is unique in the history of the British monarchy. The wedding of Albert & Victoria The portrait, known as ‘the secret picture’, was commissioned by the young Queen in 1843 as a 24th birthday present for her beloved husband Albert. It was painted by the respected artist Franz Xaver Winterhalter. April 18, 2019 Andrew Prince Jewelled Journeys:  The Art of Opulent Travel Details Throughout history, travelling has been used as a way to display wealth, power, status, as well as a useful tool to control over mighty subjects. Today, we take a journey as a matter of course, not thinking much of a distance of a hundred miles or more. In the past it was very different as an Aristocrat had to take not only clothes, but food, furniture, cooking facilities, tents, and the like, not just for himself and family but his household as well. In this talk, Andrew shows the many lavish and opulent accessories and modes of transport that were used by Monarchs and Aristocracy alike, to ease travel while on their seasonal “progress” to and from each others estates, and where diplomatic meetings between Kings turned into a contest of rivals to see who could out do each other in the finest accommodation, jewels, silks, retinue and luggage train. Entrance of the Emperor Franz I. Stephan and his son Joseph (II.) into Frankfurt on March 29, 1764 by Johann Dallinger von Dalling, 1767 May 16, 2019 Jonathan Foyle Cathedrals with Particular Mention of Peterborough and Lincoln No synopsis yet, details later. Peterborough Cathedral web site Lincoln Cathedral web site There are no meetings in June, July or August September 19, 2019 Catherine Wallace: Under the Open Sky: Newlyn, Falmouth and Lamorna Artists 1880 - 1940 This lecture gives an overview of art in Cornwall from the late19th century to the start of the Second World War that was created in and around the remote villages of Newlyn and Lamorna in West Cornwall and the port of Falmouth. It begins with the Social Realism of artists such as Walter Langley and Frank Bramley who captured the harshness of life for families in the fishing community of Newlyn. This lecture then looks at the fame that artists such as Stanhope Forbes achieved both at home and abroad in the 1880s and 90s with his depictions of village life and his fascination with capturing low light levels. It also surveys the maritime art of Henry Scott Tuke and Charles Napier Hemy who were based in Falmouth, 28 miles east of Newlyn. Some of the artists created magical fantasies rather than images of stark realism and the colourful Pre-Raphaelite inspired creations of Elizabeth Adela Forbes, Henry Meynell Rheam and Thomas Cooper Gotch are included here. The influence of the Forbes School of painting, which was established in 1899 at Newlyn by Stanhope and his wife Elizabeth, is shown in the work of some of their students such as Dod and Ernest Procter. More information on the Lamorna Artists October 17, 2019 Dr. Graham Griffiths Musical Adventures in Russia:   In Search of The Snow-Maiden Leokadiya Kashperova For a historian, there can be little to match the excitement of discovering a forgotten treasure. Dr Griffiths’s eventful research across Russia to unveil the Romantic figure of Leokadiya Kashperova (1872-1940), composer and concert pianist (previously known only as ‘Stravinsky’s piano teacher’), offers the perfect example. Kashperova’s re-discovered music establishes her as the earliest-known female Russian composer of international stature. (Rimsky-Korsakov’s affectionate nickname for her was ‘Snow- maiden’.) Kashperova’s lyrical music and Griffiths’s research were selected by BBC Radio 3 and the AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council) for inclusion in their 2018 celebration of ‘Five Forgotten Female Composers’. This presentation offers narrative, images and musical performance at the piano illustrating ‘what it takes’ to recover the life and works of a composer whom History has completely forgotten. Until now. Performance of Leokadiya Kashperova music  November 21, 2019 Charles Hajdamach Flowers of The Fields:  The World of Paperweights Glass paperweights, with their trapped secret interiors, hold a special fascination for everyone whether they are glass enthusiasts or not. This talk outlines their history from their introduction in Venice, to the classical period of French weights from Baccarat, Saint Louis and Clichy in the middle of the 19th century and ending with some of the modern weights from the famous Scottish factory of Caithness. An explanation of how weights are made will reveal the huge technical skills involved in their production. Click here for the Caithness Glass web site December 19, 2019 Claire Walsh The Christmas Tree:  From Forest Fir to Festive Feature The Christmas Tree presents us with over five centuries of art and meaning. Vital to the imagery of both the pagan world and Christianity, its significance emerges in Norse yuletide, ancient Rome and with the early-medieval saints, before its diverse strands were drawn together to symbolize the modern Christmas. It is wrapped in legend, from the Icelandic sagas to St Boniface, from the Mystery Plays to Martin Luther. In art, the forest fir has made the transition from Viking rock carvings to German Romanticism and Scandinavian naturalism, on its way to finding its place as an icon of our modern festival. Decorated and shimmering with light, it has brought Christmas from outside the home into the heart of the family, it has drawn soldiers together across No-Man’s Land, and it continues to symbolize its essential, timeless message of Peace on Earth. The History of Christmas Trees Christmas tree at Windsor Castle from The Illustrated London News Christmas supplement 1848
The Arts Society Rutland